THE BESPOKE AWARD SHORTLIST
Bespoke furniture by its very nature is special. The maker has crafted it to an exacting style and measurements for a specific purpose. The following pieces have been shortlisted for the Bespoke Award.
Calla Lampshade
By Adam Southgate
Plymouth University

Title and Brief Description
Made from 3mm steam bent Ash curls, the Calla Lampshade is a statement in any room, giving off a warm glow.

Design Summary
Due to the design and nature of the ash curls, the light reflects off the inside which then creates a warm glow through the room it is in. To make this lampshade one jig is used to make the curls which has kept the rejection waste to a minimum which means less wood is wasted creating this product. as well as this, when the wood has had a short time to set in it can be clamped and removed from the jig which therefore reduced the wait time of making. In addition to this, the 3mm pieces of ash could be green ash could be used from forest thinning to produce these as this wood is not kiln dried and it is usually just sold as firewood.

Materials Summary
As previously said, I chose ash as the main material for this piece due to the idea of using green ash could be used from forest thinning to produce these as this wood is not kiln dried and it is usually just sold as firewood. In addition to this a workshop could be set up within these forests to teach individuals about steam bending and they could come out at the end with one of these pieces. 

Craftsmanship Summary
During the making of this piece, I tried to stay away from most power tools and focus mostly on the steam box as this was how I would get the effect I wanted from my piece. However, to prepare the wood I used a bandsaw and hand sander to get the finished smooth effect on the wood. I also machined the top component to hold the curls in place which are held with wooden dowel. The curls are held in the tight shape by some brass Chicago screws which work well in the design.




@southgate.design
adam.southgate@students.plymouth.ac.uk
 
Elipse Coffee Cabinet
By Alastair Minus
Rycotewood Furniture Centre

Title and Brief Description
The Elipse Coffee Cabinet, inspired by Krenov Cabinets, featuring scorched tambour doors which wrap around the outside of the cabinet.

Design Summary
I have designed and made a coffee cabinet inspired by the cabinets of James Krenov. My coffee cabinet is designed to fit into the corner of a kitchen, where space is limited. The limited space means outward opening doors would be difficult which is why I incorporated tambour doors into the cabinet, which also work well as the cabinet is oval shaped. The tambour doors save space inside the cabinet as rather than rolling up in the cabinet as traditional tambour doors do, they instead slide around the outside of the cabinet, behind the back panel. I also designed the cabinet to link to coffee, the oval shape symbolises a coffee bean and the scorching of the tambour doors using the Japanese technique, Shou Sugi Ban relates to the roasting of the coffee.

Materials Summary
I designed my coffee cabinet to use American Red oak supplied by AHEC, this ensured the quality of the oak was high and it was sustainably sourced, I chose red oak due to its open grain which would work well with the Shou Sugi Ban. I used a fabric for the backing of the tambour doors and used a black dye to turn it black. The finish I used was Osmo clear satin. I chose Osmo as I have worked with it before and it is a very high-quality finish, I used the satin version as I wanted the finish to be more natural than a gloss.

Craftsmanship Summary
The oval panels which the tambour doors track in were cut out using the CNC which is also very new to me, the CNC was used to achieve perfect accuracy in the grooves. The back panel was made using bent lamination, using oak veneers and a mould to create the curved panel. The Shou Sugi Ban was done using a blow torch after the tambour doors were made. The legs were made using a tapering jig on the panel saw to achieve identical legs. The oval decoration between the back legs was made using hand cut half lap joints.




@Minassian_woodwork
alastairminus98@gmail.com
The Onyx Cabinet
By Charlie Teager-Neale
Rycotewood Furniture Centre

Title and Brief Description
A contemporary and sleek whiskey cabinet, featuring ornate copper door panels, integrated interior LED lighting and eliptical edge glass shelving.

Design Summary
The design behind my Onyx whiskey cabinet stems from the process itself of whiskey making in which copper distillers are used to distil the whiskey. By correlating the process and the pleasurable nature of drinking whiskey together allowed me to create a luxurious and contemporary style cabinet that I am truly proud of and enjoying gazing at. The ornate panel design and the interior lighting controlled by a sensor on the underside allow for an ornamental design, whilst still maintaining functionality with the use of the adjustable shelves to suit the client’s choice of bottles and drinking utensils. A sweeping scalloped handle is featured on the underside of the doors, creating a seamless way of opening them without visually changing the piece. The product itself is coated in Japanese black ink to compliment the copper accents as well as to provide a unique and modish aesthetic.
 
Materials Summary
American red oak was used for this project and was kindly provided by AHEC (The American Hardwood Export Council) in collaboration with Rycotewood Furniture as a collective programme for us students to design and make a piece of storage of our choosing. Their company promotes the use of sustainably produced and manged American hardwoods that are not necessarily used as frequently. I chose red oak with very uniform grain as I wanted to create a consistent look throughout the whole piece. The door panels themselves are solid red oak in which has been book matched and flipped 4 times to construct them. Japanese black ink was applied to the product to show the true beauty and versatility of a substance commonly used for writing. I then applied Satin Osmo over the top to seal and protect the finish as well as to really enhance the beauty of the grain. 

Craftsmanship Summary
Overall, I really enjoyed making my whiskey cabinet and learnt many new things whilst also progressing my skills greatly along the way. Whilst still being a student and in the depths of my learning stages of my career this piece was a true test of my abilities as this is the first time, I had used a CNC, creating the cut outs of my door panels. The whole process was eye opening and very interesting, all the way from creating a CAD file to running the programme with the tool paths and it is something I wish to use again in future projects. It was great to step out of my comfort zone compared to just using my hand tools and the generic workshop machinery I always use to create my projects. The whole process of making the piece went swimmingly however the only obstacle I came across was the glue up of the doors in which I had to create a clamping jig due to the complex curve nature of them.




@teager.neale_furniture
charlieteagerneale123@gmail.com
 
One Ash Dining Chair
By Dan Alexander
Title and Brief Description
One Ash Dining Chair - Single piece steam bent backrest, hand carved/shaped back legs, hand cut joinery and turned front legs.

Design Summary
This chair was designed primarily for use as a dining chair; however, it is suitable for relaxing and working in due to features that enhance comfort and movement while seated. The backrest is designed to support the back where the thoracic and lumbar curves meet which helps to promote good sitting posture. The raised coopered seat supports the hips and thighs, while the half-length arm rests allow the sitter to rest their arms while leaning back, but do not restrict movement if leaning forward to work or dine.
The chair was designed to be made from only the essential components, all of which should be elegant and organic. This minimal approach to design has generated a visually striking aesthetic that offsets its technical complexity through its visual simplicity.

Materials Summary
Predominantly this chair is made from English Ash donated to Rycotewood by Andover Trees United as part of their 'One Ash' project that focuses on sustainable forestry. The walnut wedges are made from another classmate’s chair offcuts, this reduced waste and aligns well with the projects focus on sustainable use of wood. The chair has been finished with raw osmo polyx oil, this has kept the Ash looking natural while offering good protection. The finish dries matt, but a subtle sheen can be achieved which compliments the light but defined grain.

Craftsmanship Summary
Hand cut joinery is a key feature of this chair. Strong, stable joints were essential to the design, and it was decided wedged through mortice and tenons would be the best solution. All these joints were cut by hand as almost all of them are angled or have compound angles. A jig for a router was used to cut the pocket in the turned lets for the front rail, but the rest of the joint was constructed with hand tools. Steam bending the backrest was a challenge due to the thickness of the timber, it took five people to bend the back around it's form.




@danismaking
Danjalex@icloud.com
Regenerated Kumkio
By Finn Timmins
Plymouth University

Title and Brief Description
A hand made standing lamp and shelf, designed and produced with traditional Japanese crafts and contemporary design tools and techniques.

Design Summary
For my final major project as a Designer Maker, I set myself a brief that was to design and create a piece of furniture that combined traditional and contemporary design practices. Through research and following interests, my chosen topics were the Japanese craft of Kumiko and generative design. I found common ground between both areas with parametric patterns and modelling, and I created algorithms within the CAD extension Grasshopper that generate random and customisable patterns which I then transferred into Kumiko patterns. With these patterns I made another algorithm that can be fed images and will recreate said images with these patterns. This then led to my bespoke standing lamp design that displays these one of a kind generated patterns and features an interchangeable front panel that can either be a handmade or a laser cut pattern of an image.
(PS The attached images are digital renders of my design; these do not include the laser cut panel designs as they are too large (in data) to be rendered.)

Materials Summary
This design is made with a beautifully grained Ash and has accents of black Wenge with a pure tung oil finish. As a designer maker I strive to have a low impact on the environment which is why I like to use locally sourced ash and natural finishes, except for the black Wenge in the piece as it was waste pieces that I was making use of.

Craftmanship Summary
The most important features in this piece are the unique handmade Kumiko panels, as not only is this a personal triumph it is also the most complex and time-consuming piece I have made as it technically consists of over 300 joints and over 600 individually cut pieces of wood. With this project came many complex problems such as designing plenty of custom jigs and learning to use and design with algorithms. Almost every aspect of this piece is handmade, the only parts not being handmade are the optional laser cut panels.




@finn_t.design
finntimmins99@gmail.com





 
Origins Homewares
By Ines Munday
Plymouth University

Title and Brief Description
Origins. Made from sustainable materials, is used to make oils and infusions, while promoting crafts, sustainable materiality and human connection.

Design Summary
Origins homewares, inspired by the elegance of Suribachi's Japanese design, celebrates ideas and principles associated with product provenance, embedded with a philosophy for social and environmental sustainability by making materiality, craft and manufacturing visible and valuable.  Designed to enrich all 5 senses and create connection and memorable experiences, coupled with social responsibility by providing sleeping mats to the homeless, it’s made up of a pestle and mortar, pots to Grow-Your-Own, and storage stand. Used to make a variety of oils/infusions to create wonderful food and drinks, scents, crafts, and more.  The complimentary Origins App supports making the most of your product while giving details of product and material origins, and ecological impact, and while promoting the crafts people and businesses involved in its production. Offering a platform for them to share resources too. Harnessing the power of origins, to effectively support a circular economy model.

Materials Summary
Uses one connecting material, Cork, with a low ecological impact in harvest, processing, transport and waste, while supporting a declining ancient industry. Other parts of the products are made with materials from crafters’ place of origin. For example, the UK’s Beech Wood used for the mortar bowl, elsewhere may use stone or other woods. Embracing the identity of material and crafters origins, supported by a larger brand network.  The cork base offers absorption of the impact and sound from the pestle and a wooden bowl allows a Suribachi inspired pattern to create added grip and friction for gridding ingredients.
Craftsmanship Summary
As a 1st year student when I designed this product range, I lacked developed woodworking skills, and due to the complexity of the Suribachi inspired pattern, as well as for a broader learning experience, the Mortar’s wooden base was made using CNC machinery. However, it can be handmade or wood-turned.  A power drill was used to create the cavity for the plant pots, which was then hand finished.




@inescapablejourney
ines.munday@students.plymouth.ac.uk
Homage to Nature
By Jarrad Belton
Chichester College

Title and Brief Description
Homage to Nature. A one-off piece celebrating the material we work with whilst embracing the beauty found in nature.

Design Summary
The piece was designed to celebrate the beauty of nature and the material we work with. Hundreds of steam-bent layers of English walnut, laminated to emulate the cross section of a tree. Three hand-turned English oak legs represent the roots of a tree. The entire piece is tied together with a focus on celebrating the timber; it's beauty and capabilities in the craft.

Materials Summary
All timber was sourced from local sawmills, from well managed forests. This piece is to celebrate the trees and to do so it was important to use sustainable timber. All the timber is from the UK so there was no extra carbon emitted on shipping. A conscious focus of mine is the environmental impact of making furniture and this is emulated in my piece.

Craftsmanship Summary
The steam-bending process for the piece was the most time-consuming part. A lot of research and jig making was required. Once I had a curved blank glue up from the strips, I then had to resaw the blank down the middle with a handsaw, this then created the perfect book match of symmetrical colours.




@jarradbelton
jarradbelton@gmail.com

 
AERO
By Joe Geehan
University of Wolverhampton

Title and Brief Description
Aero, fuses together tradition and technology – celebrating risk and certainty

Design Summary
Aero is a chair consisting of a carbon fibre cantilever arm that flows into the walnut front legs, the ribbon of curves flow seamlessly frozen in time are inspired from aerospace technology. The unmistakeable presence of the chair invites the user to enter. The hand cut seat form holds the occupant comfortably as the wide arms of the chair envelope the occupant giving them permission to relax and use their laptop or smart device. The form evokes the history of furniture making inspired from a Windsor chair. The carbon fibre begins as soft delicate woven fabric. The weave gives the feel of high-end couture. It also invokes the relationship of the fabric to the composite structure of the timber, comprised of small fibres all compressed and held together with resin. The structural brace pulls the chair together demonstrating the certainty of modern engineering with the aluminium components precisely machined.

Materials Summary
Inspiration is taken from aerospace and bicycle technology influencing the forms and choice of the composite elements. The Black American Walnut compliments the multi-faceted nature of the carbon whilst providing warmth. Tailoring the materials to ensure the user’s interaction with the contrasting textures and forms of the chair. The traditional craftsmanship is evident though the use of materials, hand craft, material choices and traditional finishes.
Aero has tested my technical and making ability as a designer combining wood, metal, and composites together. The notable manufacturing processes included the wet layup carbon fibre, off- taper turning and precision engineering skills.

Craftsmanship Summary
The carbon fibre arm presented a difficult challenge in the production of the carbon arm. 3D printing, CNC routing and multiple jigs were used to overcome. Machinery including a traditional milling machine and metal lathe were used to accurately create multiple copies of the metal work connecting the brace components. The use of jigs was paramount to assembling the final piece accurately. The use of hand tools included various gouges to form the traditional Windsor chair inspired seat form. Off taper wood turning enabled the tapered legs to form accurately on a wood lathe. The most complex issue undertaken included the accurate jointing of the carbon arm to the walnut base. This was incredible complex to ensure the cantilever was secured safely.




@joe_geehan_designs
joegeehan123@outlook.com
Stave Hill Bench
By Josephine Bourdariat
Title and Brief Description
« Stave Hill Bench » is part of a seven hand-made furniture pieces, inspired by the stave hill ecological park in London, it is made of pine wood, burned using a Japanese method called Yakisugi making it long-lasting and for outdoor use.

Design Summary
Stave Hill Ecological Park’s purpose is to alter people’s attitudes and behaviour towards nature and the environment. Working on a study based on people's posture and ways of sitting in the park. It led me to think about contemplation and the positive impact of being surrounded by nature. I kept researching the origins of Stave hill, mainly focussing on the docks. I used various maps to create patterns that would later inform the seat shapes - by combining the shape of a dock called Centre Pond and one called Quebec Pond and repeating the shape. None of the seven seats are the same. They all have a specific detail that make them unique. The benches are light and easily movable. They could be placed anywhere around the park. I decided to exhibit my work next to a fire pit to create a conviviality space. Building a green living room where conversation and contemplation mix and match.

Materials Summary
The bench is entirely hand-made using pine wood and repurposed broom handles, eco-friendly glue and bees wax varnish and finished using the Yakisugi technique that scorches the wood. This technique allows the bench to be used either indoor or outdoor as the wood is long-lasting, insect proof and waterproof. Moreover, it holds without using any other materials such as screws or nails, making it easy to disassemble and recycle.

Craftsmanship Summary
Building this bench was a long and valuable challenge. I made multiple sketches, as well as physical and 3D computer models. After carefully preparing a material list, I used my patterns to cut out the shapes using a jigsaw and drill holes in the correct position. The hand-made process was challenging, carrying, drilling, sawing, scratching, cutting, assembling. The trickiest part was to make the 25mm dowels fit in the 22mm holes. The main focus of those structures was to build without using screws -fixing elements together by sticking them to each other.





jobdt26@gmail.com
Her
By Katie Bonar
Northumbria University

Title and Brief Description
A crochet throne which intends to reverse the normalised gendered hierarchy of certain craft practices.

Design Summary
With crochet being the most prominent feature, this unusual context for this craft will prompt discussions and curiosity around the product. This will question the unconscious bias towards domesticated crafts that the viewer may have, allowing those feminine perceived crafts to gain the same respect as masculine crafts. The crochet is fundamental to the design, as the woodworking has been used as a means to support the crochet. This reverses the normal gendered hierarchy of crafts, bringing value to these undervalued feminine crafts. If we can start to accept feminine designs as being skilled in their own right, then consequently, people who practice this style will be more accepted into the industry without a negative bias towards their design styles.

Materials Summary
I chose wool to crochet with as it is a natural, sustainable material. The colour of the wool played an important part of bringing value to crochet, as purple has strong associations with luxury and power. The juxtaposition of the soft wool against the wooden frame draws more attention to the crochet elements, causing the crochet element to be the predominant feature of the chair. This power is then embodied through the crafts, further appraising this undervalued craft. If the associations surrounding crochet are reversed, this will prompt the viewer to question their unconscious bias towards this feminine perceived craft.

Craftsmanship Summary
By designing a piece of functional furniture which utilises crochet as a fundamental component, rather than purely decorative embellishment, there is an opportunity to demonstrate that crochet can be integral to a chair which incorporates woodworking. This portrays a craft which is usually limited to the domestic sphere, into the public, showing that domesticated crafts can have a valuable contribution to the furniture design industry. If certain feminine craft practices can be more accepted into the design industry without biases, this creates a much more diverse and inclusive design landscape.




behance.net/katiebonar
katiebonarr@gmail.com



 
Waste Stool
By Megan Keeling
Staffordshire University

Title and Brief Description
Waste stool - A multi-functional table/stool, with metal base and an interchangeable ceramic plate and surrounding wooden ring.

Design Summary
An interchangeable and multi-functional stool/side table.
By making the product multi-functional, my aim was to increase the use of my product in order to prevent throw away culture and to make my product more sustainable. Similarly, by making the design interchangeable, this also adds to the life and longevity of the product as if the user would like to update the product, there’s no need to buy a whole new stool/side table.
The interchangeable feature is a ceramic plate which sits inside a rim on top of the stool. This ceramic plate is textured with waste materials such as horsehair and the metal filings created when cutting the parts needed for the stool base. These waste materials are added in the casting process and when fired create unique textures.

Materials Summary
The metal base is made from mild steel tube which is flattened, bent and welded together to form the shape of the stool base. I then had the stool clear passivated to give it a silver finish.
The ceramic element utilises waste materials. For example, I placed the metal filings created when cutting the steel tube, into the slip when casting the ceramic plate in order to create a unique texture when fired. This is my way of utilising and reducing the waste created when making the stool and I hope to encourage others to be more waste conscious when hearing the story behind my stool.
I CNC cut the wooden ring out after applying oak veneer to MDF.

Craftsmanship Summary
Ensuring that the ceramic element, and wooden ring both fit snuggly into the metal rim of the stool/side table was a complex part of the designing and making process.

Power tools used include:
Mig welder
Fly press
Band saw
Kiln
CNC machine




@m_k_designs
meg.keeling@hotmail.com



 
Da Vinci Side Table
By Neil McRory
Rycotewood Furniture Centre

Title and Brief Description
The table was my final piece of the set that I made to pay homage to Da Vinci and the Golden Ratio.

Design Summary
The table was a set piece for city & guilds lv3 and we were given the freedom for the marquetry, leg stretchers and handles. The marquetry is self-explanatory, but the stretchers were designed on fusion 360, the form was cut using the cnc machine then each stretcher was laminated using 17 layers of veneer. The drawer handles and the beads between the stretchers are all turned from the same curly Maple as used on the drawer sides. I viewed all his work in la Louvre just before covid at the start of my course. I have been a fan of his inventive mind for a long time and made another piece with secret locks for Lv2 which can be viewed on my YouTube channel WoodScrape.

Materials Summary
Main carcass is American Walnut. Drawer sides Curly Maple. Veneer - Maple (hot sand shaded for marquetry). Maple and walnut for stretchers. Curly Maple for handles and beads. Finish - drawer bottoms I used Lemon Oil for the smell. The rest of the table was coated in Cellulose sanding sealant, de-nibbed with 0000 wire wool then I applied 2 coats of Microcrystalline wax and buffed with a cloth. I chose this as it was going to be in a room without direct sunlight and it was a method that would apply quickly and not leave a lingering smell as most oils do.

Craftsmanship Summary
The stretchers were the most complex part for me. They were originally designed on Fusion 360 which I've been self-learning for the past 18 moths. I then had to use those files for the CNC to cut the form. This is a technology i am keen to explore further as it can really open up the design possibilities. Marquetry was done using a simple scroll saw, 2.0 pegas blade at 17 deg for a double bevel technique. Very relaxing.




@WoodScrape
ndmcrory@gmail.com


 
Plant Furniture
By Ross Mountford

Staffordshire University

Title and Brief Description
My latest body of work is modular ‘Plant Furniture’. The design consists of three modular structures, which can interlock or be separated.

Design Summary
I aimed to create a design in which plant life could be brought into the home on a larger scale. I was inspired by the current pandemic, with people staying home more due to work closures and isolation. I began to research into what could improve people’s wellbeing and help with being home more. My results led to me Biophilic Design, which is said to reduce stress and increase productivity by incorporating nature.  People buy furniture for a purpose, and I named my design ‘plant furniture’ as I wanted to dedicate its function to plant life and the incorporation of this into the home. My design can be moved and separated, incorporating nature into multiple rooms and areas of the home.  I researched Brutalist architecture and architecture in Singapore, extracting shapes and analysing buildings to visualise how they accented each other and incorporated elements of nature.

Materials Summary
All three structures differ in height and form, the two tallest being made from oak wood and the smallest from walnut wood, meaning that the materials contrast with each other. Each form has an array of dowels, giving different heights to each structure. These dowels are equally spaced and allow for plant life to intertwine, as well as light to pass through creating a calming shadow. I have not seen a product like this on the market and feel the incorporation of natural materials and the purpose of the design to bring nature into the home a unique one.

Craftsmanship Summary
I have used a multitude of methods ranging from: CNC, using 3D software to hand building my final piece. My biggest barriers during the design process have been finalising the shape and height of the piece, as well as deciding the placement of the dowels. I have overcome these barriers through trial and error.




@rossmountforddesigns
rossmountford7@gmail.com






 

Uncut
By Toby Robson

Ravensbourne University

Title and Brief Description
Uncut is a sofa stripped back to its core components to create a more meaningful interaction with the user.

Design Summary
Uncut is a study on the interaction between users and furniture, it celebrates the processes behind manufacture by stripping the components down to their core forms and allows the user to merge with the sofa by wrapping themselves in a 4-meter noodle.

Materials Summary
80mm aluminium poles frame the sofa, attached is a 4ft down-filled bolster, that contains pockets of down with 10mm foam covering finished with 100 count cotton, that grips to the right arm of the frame. The base is disconnected made from expandable self-skinning foam. To emphasize the process and rawness of the product its connections and manufacturing techniques are left raw for example, the corner welds connecting the aluminium tubes are left unfinished as well as the bolster noodle which has heavily exposed stitching and the foam layering is visible. The base utilizes the skin from self-skinning foam creating a texture on the top.

Craftsmanship Summary
To bring the inside to the outside for better interaction, I wanted the main base of the piece to be made from entirely raw foam. To achieve this, I experimented with expanding self-skinning foams to create shapes and geometries I wanted for the sofa. I also experimented with embedding textures onto its surface to recreate the textiles that are usually overlayed foam. Exaggerating this texture, I embedded around 72 gallons of foam with this texture whilst putting in a void from wood panels to reduce the cost of the prototype. The frame was cut and welded to spec by Ferrous Wheel, based in London.




@g.f__design
tobygfrobson@gmail.com




 

Haptic Sofa
By Yuling Liu
Kingston University

Title and Brief Description
A changeable sofa that consists of four materials to show the connections between people and materials.

Design Summary
The inspiration of this project is the interaction between people and objects. Although objects around us are lifeless, they can still influence us through senses of smell, touch, hearing and so on. I choose the sense of touch to develop, and keyword is "HAPTIC". I choose sofa as the medium because it is one of the furniture’s that we spend most time on. I used four materials and each cushion has two different materials, so people could flip them to change material. People can choose different materials even colours in different states, moods and seasons. The material and colours can be combined by customers. I hope this haptic sofa could make people rethink about the relationships between themselves and objects.

Materials Summary
Customers could choose and arrange materials according to their preferences and needs. The outcome uses four materials - cotton, linen, fur and leather. Cotton and linen are suitable for hot weather while fur and leather are suitable for cold weather. People can change material according to their need.

Craftsmanship Summary
The product is mainly focused on the relationship between people and materials. It also solves the problem that people will feel uncomfortable with the sofa when season changes. For example, people will be uncomfortable when sitting on a leather sofa or use fur cushions.




yulingliu881@163.com
Float to Live Chair
By Zac Brewer
Plymouth University

Title and Brief Description
Float to Live Chair is made in response to a brief set by the RNLI, a charity dedicated to saving lives around the UK coastline.

Design Summary
The float to live chair is modelled around the RNLI's guidelines when in difficulty involving the water. They recommend floating on your back with your head back, chest up and using your arms to help you float. The deck chair style I made is designed to educate the floating position to adults as well as teach the benefits of relaxation when in difficulty.

Materials Summary
Made using locally sourced sycamore and made by hand, finished with beeswax as I wanted to let the wood speak for itself.

Craftsmanship Summary
Simply constructed using a mixture of hand techniques and power tools. The side joints were compound angles that needed hand cutting and individually fitted.




@designer_zac
zac_brewer@hotmail.com
 
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